SAMP News

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  • 27 Jan 2017 9:30 AM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) - Creating, designing, and building. Inside Cesar Gutierrez's classroom are our future engineers.


    "When I first saw these machines, I was terrified because they’re these big machines and I’m like, 'Oh my God. This is scary,'” junior Iridian Mong said.

    Gutierrez is opening up a new world for students in the manufacturing program at Desert View High School.


    "We can create your shoes. We can create a computer,” Mong said.

    "They make that connection between real world and the actual theory behind math,” Gutierrez said.


    Continue reading on TucsonNewsNow


    Watch the video

  • 20 Jan 2017 9:10 AM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    On January 11, 2017 SAMP members, students and teachers celebrated Desert View and Tucson Magnet High Schools and Pima Community College (PCC) receiving National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) accreditation for their Machining Programs.  


    NIMS accreditation means that the curriculum students are taught meet national standards. NIMS sets skills standards for the industry, certifies individual skills against the standards and accredits training programs that meet NIMS quality requirements.  


    This achievement wouldn't have been possible without the dedication of SAMP members and instructors Ray Wiggins and Chris Williams from Tucson Magnet and Cesar Gutierrez from Desert View High Schools, and Greg Wilson from PCC.


    Watch the celebration video to learn more about NIMS accreditation.

  • 19 Dec 2016 2:16 PM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    The Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partnership, Pima Community College and Pima County One-Stop celebrated the graduation of four SAMP interns on December 14, 2016. 


    Austin Bartel, Ernesto Moreno, Jonatan Ayala, and Elizaveta Packard successfully completed the Machine Tool Technology Certificate Program!


    The interns successfully completed the internship program with SAMP manufacturers while attending Pima Community College. The program gave the interns a leg up on applying the information they learned in class on the manufacturing floor.


    SAMP looks forward to the next graduating class in 2017!


  • 20 Apr 2016 4:42 PM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    When Hi-Tech Machining & Engineering was asked to manufacture parts for an oil separator assembly for North America’s biggest jet maker, Vice President Jeremy Schalk turned to a surprising partner to help fill the order: Desert View High School.


    Schalk knew better than most the capabilities of students and their instructor at Desert View High School, located in the Sunnyside Unified School District. He is a founding member of the Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partners (SAMP), a consortium of area manufacturers who in 2012 came to Arizona@Work (formerly the Pima County One-Stop Career Center) for help in filling the critical shortage of skilled young machinists.


    Arizona@Work reached out to area high schools and Pima Community College to revamp their machining curriculum and establish a pipeline of students ready to enter the field. Students pair their classroom training with internships at SAMP companies, many of whom go on to hire the students full time.


    That’s what Schalk would like to do.


    “I see this as training my future workforce,” Schalk said. His team will inspect the completed parts, and then he’ll write a check to Desert View’s Skills USA club. The funds will be processed by the school’s business office, with students voting on how the money will be apportioned.


    The teamwork is typical of “Youth Career Connect,” a partnership of Arizona@Work/Pima County, the Pima County Joint Technical Education District (JTED), the Sunnyside and Tucson Unified School Districts, Pima Community College, and nonprofit partner, Tucson Youth Development that connects youth to STEM-related careers. Arizona@Work/Pima County is the facilitator and administrator of the U.S. Department of Labor-funded project on behalf of Innovation Frontier Arizona, which also includes Santa Cruz, Pinal and Yuma counties.


    Each partner in creating a well-trained workforce brings something to the table, said Kathy Prather, Director, Career and Technical Education/JTED at SUSD. “We wouldn’t have known how to build our machining program if it weren’t for SAMP, who told us the right equipment to buy, and for JTED for funding the purchase of those machines,” she said. “This is workforce development being led by Pima County and by SAMP.”


    The program at Desert View is the only Arizona high school program on the Manufacturing Institute's "M List," which recognizes best practices in manufacturing education. The National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) also has accredited Desert View’s program -- a rigorous, three-step process that involves registering the program with NIMS, completing a self-study analysis and passing an on-site audit.


    David Morgan chairs the machine tool technology advisory committee at Pima Community College after serving as the director of business development for NIMS, where he worked with community colleges across the country to implement their credentialing. He said the pathway these Pima County partners have created for students should serve as a model for other communities.


    “The program between the high schools, JTED, Arizona@Work and industry is providing students with the knowledge, skills, and aspirations to have long-term employment with substantial earnings,” Morgan said. “There are not many communities where you find robust high school programs working in concert with higher education and industry to this degree. That’s the secret sauce here in Pima County.”


    Desert View High School and Tucson Magnet High School feed students into the industrial technology program starting in their junior year. YCC also offers pathways to careers in bioscience, health technology and aviation. Desert View’s instructor of precision manufacturing and drafting is Cesar Gutierrez.


    The first crop of students came into the program in fall 2014, with support from teachers, counselors and parents. They work toward STEM career pathways and along the way, they receive support, field trips, work experience and mentorships.

    Each fall, a new group of juniors will be encouraged by teachers and counselors to join the program. By the end of the four-year project, approximately 900 students will have gone through one of the YCC STEM pathways.

    ###


    Pima County’s Community Services, Employment and Training Department administers programs to improve the economic and social sustainability of Pima County. The Department operates ARIZONA@WORK – Innovative Workforce Solutions (formerly Pima County One-Stop Career Center system), which works with industry partners, community organizations, government agencies and faith-based groups to deliver services efficiently and effectively.


    Additional Contacts:

    Sunnyside Unified School District: Kathy Prather, Director, Career and Technical Education, KathyPr@susd12.org, 520-545-2163 (work), (520) 205-0692 (cell)


    Desert View High School: Cesar Gutierrez, Instructor, Precision Manufacturing and Drafting, CesarG@susd12.org, 520-545-5225 (work), 520-221-6230 (cell)


    Hi-Tech Machining & Engineering: Jeremy Schalk, Vice President, jeremy@hi-techmachining.net, (520) 889-8325, ext. 12


  • 19 Feb 2016 1:30 PM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    Arizona Daily Star

    By Yoohyun Jung


    More than 120 high school students, ranging from freshmen to seniors, visited 13 different manufacturing companies Friday as part of a career and technical education program.


    Pima County Youth Career Connects trains Southern Arizona’s high school students in industrial technology. It sends them to two years of school at Pima Community College and sets them up with job training, according toGerri Brunson, a coordinator for Arizona @ Work, the workforce solutions division of Pima County.


    Continue reading

  • 17 Feb 2016 7:34 AM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    As part of the Pima County Youth Career Connect industrial technologies project, high school students will get an up close look Friday, Feb. 19, at area manufacturers who produce parts for everything from airplanes and engines to zoo enclosures, thanks to tours organized by Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partners (SAMP) and ARIZONA@WORK Pima County, formerly known as the Pima County One-Stop Career Center.


    The SAMP program is in its fourth year and student interest continues to grow. This year, nearly 180 students from the Sunnyside and Tucson Unified School Districts who are part of Pima County’s Joint Technical Education District (JTED) will tour 13 manufacturers as well as Pima Community College’s machine shop and the University of Arizona Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering Department. The effort is meant to introduce students to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) careers and occupations within industrial technologies.


    The goal is that students who take part in the tours will enroll in STEM career pathways including machining courses at their high school. Manufacturers believe the tours are an important step in “on-shoring” – the move to keep more machining jobs in the United States instead of “off-shore.” 


    “On-shoring” is a trend that will continue for U.S. manufacturers and it is vital to the U.S. economy that high school students interested in manufacturing and/or machining careers are encouraged to pursue these highly skilled positions,” said Bret Simon, vice president of operations for PSE Archery in Tucson. “Machining positions in particular are in high demand domestically and the demand will grow as U.S. manufacturing companies recognize the quality and lead time advantages offered by building long-term capacity. The need is critical in Tucson and across the county, today and well into the

    future.” 


    SAMP is a consortium that comprises 32 Southern Arizona manufacturing companies throughout Pima County. The group came together in 2012 with a goal to establish a pipeline of students ready to enter the field and started by revamping the training at Pima Community College. Students finish the program with a Machine Tool Certification from Pima Community College.


    Students will be split into groups of about 10 to tour one of the 13 manufacturers taking part in the Feb. 19 field trip.



  • 15 Dec 2015 5:54 PM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    Pima County One-Stop Career Center and Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partners will celebrate the completion of a 20-month training program Dec. 16 that taught 10 young adults how to be machinists. The certificate ceremony takes place Wednesday, Dec. 16, at 6:30 p.m. in the Amethyst Room of Pima Community College’s downtown campus, 1255 N. Stone Ave. Three more students will complete the program this spring.


    The students received their initial training through the Career Technical Education machining programs at Desert View High School, Tucson High Magnet School and Palo Verde High School. From there, students worked with local manufacturers at paid internships that were initially funded by Pima County One-Stop. After two months of hands-on experience, local companies hired the students, who also were enrolled in corresponding courses in machine tool technology at Pima Community College.


    Area manufacturers decided three years ago they could compete with one another for the small pool of talented machinists in Southern Arizona or work together to train high school students or new high school graduates how to be machinists. Students finish the program with a Machine Tool Technology Certificate from Pima Community College.


    SAMP is a consortium that comprises 38 Southern Arizona manufacturing companies and 16 partners including schools, associations and agencies like the One-Stop. The group came together in 2012 with a goal to revamp machining training at Pima Community College and establish a pipeline of students ready to enter the field.


    Last year, SAMP members told Pima County One-Stop’s Business Services team they would need as many as 46 machining jobs filled in two years. Machinists in Southern Arizona can earn starting salaries of more than $24,000 and make as much as $60,000 annually, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.


    The students being recognized Dec. 16 include:

    • Michael Barnes
    • Jesus Olivarez
    • Patrick Meegan
    • Emmanuel Calderon
    • Michael Long
    • Christian Trevino
    • Steven Hammond

    Pima County One-Stop provided funding and training

    • Alejandro Alvarez
    • Desarae Stephens
    • Erick Lizarraga

    Employers that hosted interns were:

    • Abrams Airborne Manufacturing, Inc.
    • AGM Container Controls, Inc.
    • American Turbo Systems
    • Argus Machine
    • B/E Aerospace
    • Hi-Tech Machining & Engineering
    • Industrial Tool, Die & Engineering, Inc.
    • Johns Manville
    • Sargent Aerospace & Defense
    • Zygo


  • 12 Mar 2015 3:22 PM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    A select group of 13 Desert View, Tanque Verde and Tucson high school students participated in SAMP interviews at Pima Community College on March 12, 2015. They were competing for placement in SAMPs 2015 summer internship program.

    Continue reading AZ Star article

  • 28 Jan 2015 9:54 AM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    High school students will get an up close look Feb. 5 at area manufacturers who produce parts for everything from appliances and airplanes to engines and data systems, thanks to tours organized by Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partners (SAMP) and the Pima County One-Stop Career Center.


    The program is in its third year and student interest continues to grow. This year more than 200 students from Desert View High School in the Sunnyside Unified School District will tour 16 manufacturers as well as Pima Community College’s machine shop, and behind-the-scenes areas at the UA Tech Park. The effort is meant to introduce students to Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) careers and occupations within the manufacturing industry.


    The goal is that students who take part in the tours will enroll in STEM career pathways including machining courses at their high school. The SAMP program gives them the chance to take part in an 18-month program that couples coursework at Pima Community College with paid internships at local machine shops.

    SAMP is a consortium that comprises 32 Southern Arizona manufacturing companies throughout Pima County. The group came together in 2012 with a goal to establish a pipeline of students ready to enter the field and started by revamping the training at Pima Community College. Students finish the program with a Machine Tool Certification from Pima Community College.

    Some of the machine shops that students will be touring Feb. 5 are American Turbo Systems, CAID Industries, Grafted Growers, Industrial Tool Die & Engineering and Laron Inc. For more information about One-Stop services, please visit the One-Stop website at www.pimaworks.com


  • 07 Jan 2015 8:10 AM | Shelly Glandon (Administrator)

    Pima County's One-Stop Career Center and Southern Arizona Manufacturing Partners celebrated its first graduating class of machinists.


    The students received their initial training from the Career Technical Education machining programs at Desert View High School and Tucson High Magnet School. The program also had students interning with local manufacturers.


    Watch the video story on KVOA website.  


    Argus Machine Shop does precision machining for Tucson companies. The local manufacturing business gave Roberto Heredia his first job after completing Pima County's program.


    "To be able to mold them and put them in different areas; to get their interests and actually get them into the workforce for the future needs was [a] really important thing," said Tom Beishuizen, president of Argus.

    Argus became a part of the program to build a workforce for the future.

    "Some employees, who were trained a number o decades ago in the machining industry have actually exited the workforce," said Beishuizen. "So you're working on the need for the next 10, 20, or 30 years."

    Heredia graduated in December, but said his education has not stopped.

    "I'm barely starting, so I have a lot of growing and a long way to go still. Actually, I love my shop and I'm really happy here," said Heredia.

    With a growing program, there is a need for more local manufacturing companies to provide internships.  


    Story provided by KVOA reporter Domenica Fuller. 


    To join SAMP please contact Gerri Brunson.


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